Last edited by Kelabar
Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

7 edition of The shape of apocalypse in modern Russian fiction found in the catalog.

The shape of apocalypse in modern Russian fiction

by David M. Bethea

  • 140 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by Princeton University Press in Princeton, N.J .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Russian fiction -- 19th century -- History and criticism,
  • Russian fiction -- 20th century -- History and criticism,
  • Apocalyptic literature -- History and criticism,
  • End of the world in literature

  • Edition Notes

    StatementDavid M. Bethea.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPG3096.A65 B48 1989
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxix, 307 p. ;
    Number of Pages307
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2036450M
    ISBN 100691067465
    LC Control Number88012639

      Books can be incredibly powerful. They have the ability to suck us in, take us on adventures, and influence the way we think. They can teach us, move us, give us new perspectives, and help shape .   “The Apocalypse,” a headline in the Lebanese daily L’Orient-Le Jour read. The blasts could not have come at a worse time for the country. They may mark the end of modern .

      As a result, the reader will find some unexpected ‘reads’ of familiar works in the literary and arts sections and an interesting variety of opinions regarding Eastern Orthodoxy and apocalypse in the philosophy section.” (Sarah Predock Burke The Russian Review, January (Vol. 73, No. 1)). Starting with the history of apocalyptic tradition in the West and focusing on modern Japanese apocalyptic science fiction in manga, anime, and novels, Motoko Tanaka shows how science fiction reflected and coped with the devastation in Japanese national identity after

    The Apocalypse rules pop culture. Half the biggest literary novels these days are apocalyptic, and meanwhile The Walking Dead is a huge hit. Post-apocalyptic stories are what space opera was in.   It’s a classic theme of science fiction: something really, really bad happens, and mankind is knocked back to the Stone Age. Of course, with the dropping of atomic bombs by the U.S. to end World War II, people came to realize that for the first time Man himself possessed the power to bring about a global cataclysm.


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The shape of apocalypse in modern Russian fiction by David M. Bethea Download PDF EPUB FB2

Thomas Gaiton Marullo, Modern Fiction Studies "It is not often one comes across a book that is not only a major contribution to the field, but whose appearance calls for a celebration.

David Bethea's The Shape of Apocalypse in Modern Russian Fiction is such a book."Laura D. Weeks, The Russian ReviewCited by: David Bethea examines the distinctly Russian view of the "end" of history in five major works of modern Russian fiction.

Originally published in The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press.

—-Thomas Gaiton Marullo, Modern Fiction Studies "It is not often one comes across a book that is not only a major contribution to the field, but whose appearance calls for a celebration. David Bethea's The Shape of Apocalypse in Modern Russian Fiction is such a book."—-Laura D. Weeks, The Russian Review.

From the PublisherCited by: David Bethea's The Shape of Apocalypse in Modern Russian Fiction is such a book."—Laura D. Weeks, The Russian Review "The terrifying enormity of the apocalyptic theme in Russian literature fails to daunt Bethea, author of the acclaimed Khodasevich. His present book is brilliant, elegantly presented, and invaluable to anyone from undergraduate.

Get this from a library. The Shape of Apocalypse The shape of apocalypse in modern Russian fiction book Modern Russian Fiction. [David M Bethea] -- David Bethea examines the distinctly Russian view of the "end" of history in five major works of modern Russian fiction.

Originally published in The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest. Shape of apocalypse in modern Russian fiction. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, © (DLC) (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File: All Authors / Contributors: David M Bethea.

David Bethea examines the distinctly Russian view of the "end" of history in five major works of modern Russian fiction. Originally published in ThePrinceton Legacy Libraryuses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press.

The Shape of Apocalypse in Modern Russian Fiction. Series:Princeton Legacy Library PRINCETON UNIVERSITY PRESS ,95 € / $ / £* Add to Cart.

eBook (PDF) Course Book Free shipping for non-business customers when ordering books at De Gruyter Online. Please find details to our shipping fees here. RRP: Recommended Retail. Read "David M. Bethea. The Shape of Apocalypse in Modern Russian Fiction. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, xix, pp.

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Analysis; You'll. Similar Items. The shape of apocalypse in modern Russian fiction / by: Bethea, David M., Published: () The shape of apocalypse in modern Russian fiction / by: Bethea, David M., Published: () Russian experimental fiction: resisting ideology after Utopia / by: Clowes, Edith W., Published: ().

David Bethea examines the distinctly Russian view of the “end” of history in five major works of modern Russian fiction. Originally published in The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press.

Very Best Post-Apocalyptic Fiction My list of Best Post-Apocalyptic Fiction. I know there are many others, but these are the books I have read and can vouch for.

Similar Items. The shape of apocalypse in modern Russian fiction / by: Bethea, David M., Published: () The shape of apocalypse in modern Russian fiction / by: Bethea, David M., Published: () The Russian revolutionary novel: Turgenev to Pasternak / by: Freeborn, Richard. Apocalyptic fiction is a subgenre of science fiction that is concerned with the end of civilization due to a potentially existential catastrophe such as nuclear warfare, pandemic, extraterrestrial attack, impact event, cybernetic revolt, technological singularity, dysgenics, supernatural phenomena, divine judgment, climate change, resource depletion or some other general disaster.

Moby-Dick, by Herman Melville Perhaps the most notorious “eat your vegetables” novel of all time, Moby-Dick looms on many people’s literary bucket lists like a shadow—too long, too flowery, and much too concerned with 19th century whaling tactics.

But it must read for the simple reason that understanding much of the literature that followed novel requires it, so profound was its influence. Not even during the Cold War were science fiction books about the apocalypse and life afterward so popular.

Electricity goes out worldwide due to a Russian experiment in Iran. Scientists in America get diesel trucks to run then take their families cross country. 25 Best Science Fiction Books for Kids.

23 Best Modern Post-apocalyptic Books. by Daisy Luther. A while back, I asked you to tell me your favorite non-fiction prepping books.

(Here’s the list of books that were recommended for the Reader’s Choice Survival and Preparedness Library.)But since life can still be productive with a little entertainment, some readers also recommended prepper fiction that they had learned from.

Post-apocalyptic means that an APOCALYPSE has occurred (meaning some massive event that has destroyed much of life on earth) and the story takes place after the apocalypse. Dystopian means a story is taking place in a setting where the government is the opposite of a utopia (so, rather than being a perfect place, it is the opposite of perfect.

Few post apocalyptic books have achieved the same level of success as Max Brook’s ‘oral history of the zombie war‘. World War Z recounts the events of a zombie apocalypse, through the eyes of a scientist trying to understand and explain the events that lead to the outbreak.

Collating stories retold by dozens of survivors, the book is a. Top 10 books about the apocalypse Weaponised flu, hoax bombs that start exploding, totalitarian America and brain-thirsty zombies – here’s a flood of fictional world endings – and one that.Apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic fiction is a subgenre of science fiction, science fantasy, dystopian or horror in which the Earth's technological civilization is collapsing or has collapsed.

The apocalypse event may be climatic, such as runaway climate change; astronomical, such as an impact event; destructive, such as nuclear holocaust or resource depletion; medical, such as a pandemic.